The internet and the erosion of subscription TV, cable and associated media


The best television is free. So is video when one considers the cost-benefit ratio of what the masses usually get. Crap is the coin of the realm and what passes for content is an unrelenting stream commercialism interrupted by bits of pertinent information and entertainment.

Going without cable or satellite is unthinkable to many Americans — just over 90% of U.S. households subscribe to some form of pay TV. But just as mobile phones have replaced many customers’ land-line service, Vittore said on-demand Internet video will soon whittle that 90% figure down. (Vince Vittore, Analyst, Yankee Group)

But all that is in the process of changing under the unrelenting onslaught of  the internet and associated technologies. Say hello to the more democratized milieu of the world wide web.

We at Cyberaxis are not deluded however. The ancien (media) regime is not dead. Corporations and their governmental cohorts still rule the world, but cracks in the edifice still do appear from time to time: cracks in which hardy foliage grows.

The internet has changed a lot of the rules of the game and the vested stakeholders, both corporate and governmental, are scrambling to jostle for new pole positions. (Read up on internet neutrality, privacy and custodianship of information in the brave new world.) And nowhere is this dissolution, this lysis, more evident than in the area of the old media versus the new.

Cable had a chance earlier in the decade to give us an a la carte service. They chose not to. It may be too late for them. The model is changing so fast they may never get the lost viewers back no matter how nice they decide to play now.  (Everett Hutchinson)

The subscription model of content as purveyed by the cable and satellite industry is being whacked by the internet just like the film, recording and newspaper industry were undermined by the same. The aspect of retributive justice is not lost on many. Free is the new good in the millenium of bits, bytes, hotspots and the brave new world of the world wide web. The Google story is very instructive of what has happened in terms of free content.

Man with laptop on beach.

On the beaches of the world wide web, free is good.  Hallelujah and thank you Jesus!  (Photo by Avava)

As far as electronic content is concerned, start your search here for the yellow brick road that leads to the Emerald City. What we hope for is none other than a living manifesto of liberation ……  Liberation of the new netizen from the chains of the ancien regime.

Start with the Cyberaxis Media Center here.

This list of free TV, video, film and radio  is a work in progress. Links are gonna be added and deleted as time progresses. So if you find something you really like, save it to your bookmarks. Meanwhile, consider this your own Free Media Console. The smoothness of the play will depend of several factors like your connection, settings and or the streaming aspect of the website you are accessing.  In some cases you need to let the video load at little before commencing play. So be patient. We’ll get there.

I cut my cable service completely. I don’t pay for a home phone either. I found out that Comcast does not like that at all. They doubled what I pay for internet and capped how much data I can stream per month. $60/mo for internet is close to ridiculous. I read somewhere that internet only takes up the bandwidth of two channels. That means I’m paying $60/mo for two stinking channels. I hate Comcast. The value of cable has become so inflated, the market is bound for a correction at some point. I hope mobile broadband can give the cable company a run for their money. (Fill Westcott)

copyright© 2009 cyberaxis.wordpress.com

Appendix:

TV Is Dying, And Here Are The Stats That Prove It (Jim Edwards, Business Insider/Yahoo Finance)

Cyberaxis Media Center (Cyberaxis)

Estimate: 800,000 U.S. Households Abandoned Their TVs For The Web (Tech Crunch)

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